image_alt_text
5

Athanassios Sambanis, Ph.D.

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2005
For fundamental contributions to tissue engineering and the characteriztion of cells, tissues and tissue substitutes.

Georgia Tech Awarded $1.2 Million Diabetes Training Grant

Via Georgia Tech News Center | November 8, 2012

The Georgia Institute of Technology has been awarded $1.2 million by the National Institutes of Health for a training program for post-doctoral fellows to develop bioengineering skills and leadership applicable to research into type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).  The Innovation and Leadership in Engineering Technologies and Therapies (ILET2) for diabetes postdoctoral training grant is a cross-disciplinary training program in cell- and tissue-based therapies and novel insulin delivery technologies.

Ten faculty members from Georgia Tech and Emory University will participate in the program, which is expected to train four postdoctoral fellows per year over a period of five years.  Athanassios Sambanis, a professor in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Tech, will direct the effort, which will be administratively supported by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

“The expertise of Georgia Tech researchers in biomaterials and cell therapies, combined with the clinical expertise of our Emory colleagues, should enable the development of new technologies and solutions to this complex health care problem,” Sambanis said.  “As engineers and researchers, it is our job to look at obstacles in new ways and find improved answers.”

...

Georgia Tech Gets $1.2M Diabetes Training Grant

Via American City Business Journals | November 7, 2012

Georgia Tech receieved a $1.2 million federal grant to train post-doctoral fellows to develop bioengineering skills to research into type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).

The grant, awarded by the National Institutes of Health, is a cross-disciplinary training program in cell- and tissue-based therapies and novel insulin delivery technologies.

Ten faculty members from Georgia Tech and Emory University will participate in the program, which is expected to train four postdoctoral fellows annually, over a period of five years.

Athanassios Sambanis, a professor in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Tech, will direct the effort, which will be supported by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

...