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Michael King, Ph.D.

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2014
For increasing our understanding of the transport and adhesion of blood cells and circulating tumor cells in the bloodstream.

School of Engineering Recruits Biomedical Engineering Chair, New Faculty Members

Via Vanderbilt | October 5, 2016

The Vanderbilt University School of Engineering announces the appointment of senior faculty to the Department of Biomedical Engineering, and four junior faculty members representing biomedical, mechanical and computer science and computer engineering departments.

Michael R. King will join Vanderbilt as professor and chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Cynthia Reinhart-King will join biomedical engineering as professor and will direct new research initiatives related to the emerging area of regenerative medicine.

The Kings are currently at Cornell University where Michael King is the Daljit S. and Elaine Sarkaria Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and Cynthia Reinhart-King is associate professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Their appointments are effective Jan. 1, 2017, pending approval by the Vanderbilt University Board of Trust.

Michael King is an expert on the receptor-mediated adhesion of circulating cells, and has developed new computational and in vitro models to study the function of leukocytes, platelets, stem and circulating tumor cells under flow. He has written textbooks on the subjects of statistical methods and microchannel flows, and he is currently the editor-in-chief of Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering.

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Professor Michael King Receives Outstanding Speaker Award For 2013 From AACC

Via Cornell News | April 28, 2014

The American Association of Clinical Chemistry is pleased to honor Prof. Michael King with AACC’s Outstanding Speaker Award for 2013. This award recognizes his achievement in earning a speaker evaluation rating of 4.5 or higher during a 2013 continuing education activity accredited by AACC. King earned this distinction for his presentation at the Upstate New York AACC Annual Spring Meeting, held May 9 – 10, 2013 at ACM Laboratories in Rochester, New York, in the opening talk entitled “Rolling in the deep: Tumor cell adhesion and treatment in the bloodstream.”

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Cornell Team Finds Success Sending ‘Cancer-Killing Machines’ Through Bloodstream

Via Cornell University | January 13, 2014

Biomedical engineers at Cornell University are turning sticky nanoparticles into “cancer-killing machines” to prevent cancer cells from spreading throughout the body. 

The groundbreaking research could one day pave the way for eliminating 90 percent of cancer deaths.

 The research team, which recently published its findings in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is led by Cornell professor of biomedical engineering Michael King. His team began their research about 4½ years ago.

 “About two years into the project we really realized what we’ve been sitting on and just how remarkable this approach was,” said King, of Ithaca. “Most drug delivery strategies, the easiest thing to do is kill cancer cells, for instance, that are sitting in a test tube by themselves. But we have a very different type of technology where we put these nanoparticles into the blood and it works far better in the complicated environment of flowing blood than it ever did in a dish or a test tube. It’s fairly unique in that respect.”

 The process is designed to combat metastasis, in which invasive cancer cells from a primary tumor migrate through tissue and spread to distant organs via the bloodstream.

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Piggy-Backing Proteins Ride White Blood Cells to Wipe Out Metastasizing Cancer

Via Cornell Media Relations | January 6, 2014

Cornell biomedical engineers have discovered a new way to destroy metastasizing cancer cells traveling through the bloodstream – lethal invaders that are linked to almost all cancer deaths – by hitching cancer-killing proteins along for a ride on life-saving white blood cells.

“These circulating cancer cells are doomed,” said Michael King, Cornell professor of biomedical engineering and the study’s senior author. “About 90 percent of cancer deaths are related to metastases, but now we’ve found a way to dispatch an army of killer white blood cells that cause apoptosis – the cancer cell’s own death – obliterating them from the bloodstream. When surrounded by these guys, it becomes nearly impossible for the cancer cell to escape.”

Metastasis is the spread of a cancer cells to other parts of the body. Surgery and radiation are effective at treating primary tumors, but difficulty in detecting metastatic cancer cells has made treatment of the spreading cancers problematic, say the scientists.

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Metastatic Cancer Cells Implode on Protein Contact

Via Cornell Chronicle | January 6, 2014

By attaching a cancer-killer protein to white blood cells, Cornell biomedical engineers have demonstrated the annihilation of metastasizing cancer cells traveling throughout the bloodstream.

The study, “TRAIL-Coated Leukocytes that Kill Cancer Cells in the Circulation,” was published online the week of Jan. 6 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“These circulating cancer cells are doomed,” said Michael King, Cornell professor of biomedical engineering and the study’s senior author. “About 90 percent of cancer deaths are related to metastases, but now we’ve found a way to dispatch an army of killer white blood cells that cause apoptosis – the cancer cell’s own death – obliterating them from the bloodstream. When surrounded by these guys, it becomes nearly impossible for the cancer cell to escape.”

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Michael King Leads Journal on Nanotechnology in Medicine

Via Cornell Chronicle | March 12, 2012

Michael R. King, associate professor of biomedical engineering, is editor-in-chief of the first scientific journal focused on nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires applied to medicine and biology.

The online, peer-reviewed journal Nanotube Therapy launched in March through the open-access publisher Versita. The journal publishes papers on the chemistry, biology and engineering involved in the application of nanotube technology for the improvement of human health. Material properties, novel devices and clinical studies are all within the scope of the journal.

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