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Juergen K. Willmann, M.D.

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2017
For fundamental contributions to bioengineering and medicine through the development and clinical translation of molecular imaging of cancer with ultrasound.

Innovator, imaging expert Juergen Willmann dies at 45

Via Stanford University | January 11, 2018

Juergen Willmann, an international scholar, dedicated himself to advancing cancer detection imaging technologies and leading with energy and compassion.

Juergen Willmann, MD, a professor of radiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, died Jan. 8 in a car accident in Palo Alto. He was 45.

Willmann honed a specific diagnostic tool known as targeted contrast microbubbles to detect early tumors and deliver targeted drugs in the body with the help of ultrasound imaging. Over a decade at the School of Medicine, his lab advanced the microbubble work from the bench to animals, all the way to the first clinical imaging trials in humans, in which microbubbles were used to detect breast and ovarian cancer.

Described as both a brilliant clinician scientist and a compassionate family man, Willmann was known for his boundless energy and empathy. He loved music, played four instruments, was an accomplished pianist and considered becoming a professional musician before deciding on a medical career… Continue reading.

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Juergen K. Willmann, M.D. To be Inducted into Medical and Biological Engineering Elite

Via AIMBE | February 21, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C.— The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the pending induction of Juergen K. Willmann, M.D., Professor of Radiology, Clinical Chief of Body Imaging, Department of Radiology, Body Imaging Division, Stanford University School of Medicine, to its College of Fellows. Dr. Willmann was nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows For fundamental contributions to bioengineering and medicine through the development and clinical translation of molecular imaging of cancer with ultrasound..

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