image_alt_text
1

George M. Pantalos, Ph.D., FAIMBE

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2003
For continuing leadership in the development of implantable ventricular assist systems, and in modeling cardiovascular response to weightlessness.

CII Investigator Recognized at the American Red Cross National Awards

Via Cardiovascular Innovation Institue | March 20, 2013

The Hall of Service, American Red Cross National Headquarters in Washington, D.C. hosted a recognition dinner on March 20, 2013 in honor of exceptional works with the American Red Cross.  Dr. Pantalos was an honoree at the event.

Dr. George Pantalos, Ph.D. is a member of the River Valley Blood Services Region Advisory Board, a dedicated platelet donor, a member of the region’s A-Team (Apheresis Team), a member of the Diversity Committee, and chair of the Community Outreach Committee.  He has served on the Platelet Advisory Group and as a first aid and disaster relief volunteer.  He is currently a professor of Surgery and Bioengineering and Principal Investigator at the University of Louisville/Jewish Hospital’s Cardiovascular Innovation Institute.

Dr. Pantalos began donating blood 30 years ago while a student at the Ohio State University.  Since 2000, in the River Valley Region  he has made more than 160 platelet and whole blood donations.  His platelet donations in the past 12 months put him in the top 15 percent of the region’s platelet donors.

...

Mars Journey: Researchers Test Methods For Doing ‘Astrosurgery’ In Zero Gravity

Via Houston Public Media | January 21, 2013

NASA is hoping to send humans to Mars within twenty years. In the private sector, companies are working on plans to mine asteroids and launch tourists into orbit. This all means humans will soon be spending longer and longer amounts of time in space, and potentially getting sick or injured up there. As KUHF Health and Science reporter Carrie Feibel found, researchers are already developing the techniques to conduct surgery in space.

The 727 taxis to a stop at Ellington Field. It’s a specially modified plane that many simply call “the vomit comet.”

The plane has spent the last few days flying in arcing parabolas so scientists can conduct experiments under zero-gravity conditions. It’s the last flight of the day and the scientific teams are packing up their equipment.

“It was a constant challenge, and it’s a good thing we had straps over our feet so we could keep ourselves planted.”

Jennifer Hayden, a researcher from Carnegie Mellon, says it was her first time experiencing weightlessness.

“I constantly had the sensation like I was upside down. Even though I knew I wasn’t, I just constantly felt I was upside down because there was no weight.”

On the vomit comet, each episode of zero gravity lasts about 20 seconds.

But Hayden and her two colleagues had no time to enjoy it. They were busy cutting into fake arteries to make fake blood flow out, and also operating on a pig’s heart.

George Pantalos is with the University of Louisville. He says the experiments will help surgeons learn how to control blood flow in outer space. Without gravity, blood forms into globules and floats around.

“You can’t have blood squirting across the cabin. You can’t have tissue and other debris either leaving the patient and getting into the cabin or possibly some contaminant from the cabin infecting the incision.”

Eventually, the team plans to build an enclosed surgical chamber to keep everything inside.

“What we envision when the development is done is a clear plastic device about the size of half a grapefruit. So that it could stick directly over the location on the patient’s body where the surgery is necessary.

...

U of L Researcher Working on Astro-Surgical Device

Via WDRB | October 9, 2012

A U of L researcher is working on an “out-of-this-world” concept: testing astro-surgery.

And NASA is really hoping the idea works.

With a crocheted space mobile and a blow-up shuttle, it’s easy to see George Pantalos’ passion.

“I can remember back when I was in high school, which was back in the days of Apollo, that I wanted to be in the space program,” Pantalos said. “Now, working on a surgical device that could be used in space flight is the fulfillment of that dream.”

Surgery…in space? How?

The U of L Professor showed us a new creation inside his lab the Cardiovascular Innovation Institute. It’s called the Hermetic Surgical System. Pantalos’ device tries to contain the surgical field so a patient or astronaut doesn’t lose blood or body parts to gravity.

...

Researchers Test Zero-Gravity Surgery Device

Via USA Today | October 5, 2012

What happens when astronauts are hurtling toward Mars on a years-long space voyage and one is injured, requiring emergency surgery in a environment lacking gravity?

It may sound like science fiction, but it’s one of the challenges NASA faces in its goal of putting astronauts on Mars by 2035. And it has spurred a University of Louisville researcher to test a potentially lifesaving surgical device aimed at helping make zero-gravity surgery possible.

George Pantalos, a professor of surgery and bioengineering, and colleagues from Carnegie Mellon University are conducting four days of tests this week in Houston aboard a NASA zero-gravity jet known as the “vomit comet,” which flies in gut-churning parabolic arcs to generate 20 to 30 seconds of weightlessness.

They’re testing prototypes of an “aqueous immersion surgical system” — an airtight and watertight dome with surgical ports that would be filled with saline and surround a wound in a zero-gravity environment. The idea is to stop bleeding and contain fluids that would otherwise float through the spacecraft, potentially endangering the patient and crew.

...

Team with U of L Researcher Rides NASA’s ‘Vomit Comet’ to Test Zero-Gravity Surgery Device

Via The Courier-Journal | October 5, 2012

What happens when astronauts are hurtling toward Mars on a years-long space voyage and one is injured, requiring emergency surgery in a environment lacking gravity?

It may sound like science fiction, but it’s one of the challenges NASA faces in its goal of putting astronauts on Mars by 2035. And it has spurred a University of Louisville researcher to test a potentially lifesaving surgical device aimed at helping make zero-gravity surgery possible.

George Pantalos, a professor of surgery and bioengineering, and colleagues from Carnegie Mellon University are conducting four days of …

...

Space Surgery Possible with Zero-Gravity Tool

Via New Scientist | September 29, 2012

Draining an infected abscess on Earth is a straightforward procedure. On a spaceship travelling to the moon or Mars, it could kill everyone on board.

Blood and bodily fluids cannot be contained in zero gravity, which means there is currently no way to perform surgery in space without contaminating the cabin. This makes an extended stay problematic, says James Antaki at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

“Based on statistical probability, there is a high likelihood of trauma or a medical emergency on a deep space mission,” he says.

Antaki is part of a team of US researchers developing an astro-surgical tool that could help.

The Aqueous Immersion Surgical System, or AISS, is a transparent box that creates a watertight seal when it is placed over a wound and pumped full of sterile saline solution, says George Pantalos at the University of Louisville in Kentucky.

...

Collaborative Team Develops New Astro Surgery Tools for NASA Deep Space Missions

Via Carnegie Mellon Engineering | September 20, 2012

Move over “Bones” McCoy. Future voyages of the starship Enterprise just might include astro surgery as this dynamic discipline jumps from the pages of fiction to reality.

A team of biomedical engineering researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Louisville are developing surgical tools that could be used for future expeditionary spaceflights to the moon, an asteroid or Mars.

“In deep space, surgical procedures will be severely complicated by absence of gravity, where it becomes difficult to prevent cabin contamination from blood and body fluids,” said James Antaki, a professor of biomedical engineering at CMU.

To address these challenges of surgical care in zero gravity, Antaki along with George M. Pantalos, a professor of surgery and bioengineering at the University of Louisville, and CMU researchers James E. Burgess and Jennifer A. Hayden are developing a watertight surgery system to isolate the wound and control bleeding by creating a pressurized aqueous environment within the surgical field.

...

Carnegie Mellon Project Could Make Surgery in Space Possible

Via Trib Live | September 2, 2012

The health of astronauts on space missions to Mars could hinge on research conducted along the banks of the Monongahela River.

Biomedical engineering researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, with a colleague from the University of Louisville, are developing a device that would enable surgery in space — which isn’t currently possible, despite what science fiction leads us to believe.

...