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Anant Madabhushi, Ph.D.

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2015
For outstanding research and translational contributions in the field of medical image analysis and computer aided diagnosis

New Machine-learning Program Shows Promise for Early Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Via Case Western Reserve | August 16, 2017

A new machine-learning program developed by researchers at Case Western Reserve University appears to outperform other methods for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease before symptoms begin to interfere with everyday living, initial testing shows.

More than 5 million Americans may have Alzheimer’s disease, according to estimates, and the numbers are growing as the population ages. The disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills. And while there is no cure, several drugs can delay or prevent symptoms from worsening for up to five years or more, according to the National Institute on Aging and published research.

Meanwhile, early diagnosis and treatment—the goal of the new computer-based program—is key to allowing those with the disease to remain independent longer.

The computer program integrates a range of Alzheimer’s disease indicators, including mild cognitive impairment. In two successive stages, the algorithm selects the most pertinent to predict who has Alzheimer’s… Continue reading.

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Changes In Benign Tissue Next To Prostate Tumors May Predict Biochemical Recurrence Of Cancer, Scientists Find

Via CWRU | August 2, 2016

Changes in benign tissues next to prostate tumors may provide an early warning for patients at higher risk for biochemical recurrence after a radical prostatectomy, a study by researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions shows.

Biochemical recurrence, which is increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, can be used to predict which prostate cancer patients will develop local recurrence, distant metastases and death.

In a small sampling, image analysis of the adjacent tissue was a better predictor than the current standard for prognosis following the prostatectomy.

If preliminary findings are confirmed by further studies, they may help doctors decide sooner which patients need more follow-up therapies after surgery or should return for more regular monitoring.

“In a sense, this study is validating what a lot of people think regarding these cancers—that there is a field effect, as if the tumor has hard-to-see tentacles that can affect the patient and outcomes,” said Anant Madabhushi, the F. Alex Nason professor II of biomedical engineering at Case Western Reserve and leader of the research.

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Changes In Benign Tissue Next To Prostate Tumors May Predict Biomedical Recurrence of Cancer, Scientists Find

Via Case THINK | July 6, 2016

CLEVELAND—Changes in benign tissues next to prostate tumors may provide an early warning for patients at higher risk for biochemical recurrence after a radical prostatectomy, a study by researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions shows.

Biochemical recurrence, which is increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, can be used to predict which prostate cancer patients will develop local recurrence, distant metastases and death.

In a small sampling, image analysis of the adjacent tissue was a better predictor than the current standard for prognosis following the prostatectomy.
If preliminary findings are confirmed by further studies, they may help doctors decide sooner which patients need more follow-up therapies after surgery or should return for more regular monitoring.

“In a sense, this study is validating what a lot of people think regarding these cancers—that there is a field effect, as if the tumor has hard-to-see tentacles that can affect the patient and outcomes,” said Anant Madabhushi, the F. Alex Nason professor II of biomedical engineering at Case Western Reserve and leader of the research.

Madabhushi worked with Case Western Reserve’s George Lee, a research assistant professor, and Sahirzeeshan Ali, a PhD student, and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions’ Robert W. Veltri, associate professor of urology, and Jonathan I. Epstein, the Reinhard Professor of Urologic Pathology. Their study is published in the journal European Urology Focus.

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New Technology Quantifies Effects Of Prostate Tumor Laser Ablation

Via Case THINK | April 19, 2016

CLEVELAND—Prostate cancers are either low-grade, low-risk forms that may be monitored but otherwise untreated. Or they’re serious enough to require surgery and radiation.
Monitoring can cause patients anxiety. Radical treatment comes with complications.
For those patients with a low-risk form who still want to take action, MRI-guided laser ablation is a growing treatment that occupies the middle ground by killing tumor cells directly while limiting the effects to the immediate location.
But what happens to the prostate after ablation?
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed computational tools to use magnetic resonance images to quantitatively evaluate the effects on the form and structure of the prostate following treatment.
“The risks of surgery and radiation are well known,” said Anant Madabhushi, professor of biomedical engineering at Case Western Reserve and director of the Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics. “This image analysis technology may help us understand the risks of ablation.”

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New Image Analytics May Offer Quick Guidance For Breast Cancer Treatment

Via Case THINK | February 18, 2016

CLEVELAND—For women with the most common type of breast cancer, a new way to analyze magnetic resonance images (MRI) data appears to reliably distinguish between patients who would need only hormonal treatment and those who also need chemotherapy, researchers from Case Western Reserve University report.
The analysis may provide women diagnosed with estrogen positive-receptor (ER-positive) breast cancer answers far faster than current tests and, due to its expected low cost, open the door to this kind of testing worldwide.
The research is published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports.
“In the United States, nearly 70 percent of all breast cancer patients are diagnosed with ER-positive, but the majority don’t need chemotherapy,” said Anant Madabhushi, biomedical engineering professor at Case Western Reserve and research leader.
“Until about 15 years ago, doctors had no way of telling aggressive cancer from non-aggressive, so the majority of women got chemotherapy, which can produce very harsh side effects,” he said.
Since then, a genomic test for differentiating between aggressive and nonaggressive cancer was developed. The test requires doctors to send a biopsy sample to a company that analyzes it and assigns a risk score that the doctors then use to guide treatment.
“The test is used frequently in the United States, but it destroys tissue, requires shipping and costs about $4,000,” said Madabhushi, who is a member of the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. “The cost puts the test out of reach for people in middle- and low-income countries.”

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CWRU Researchers Building Digital Pathology Tools To Predict Cancer Outcomes

Via CWRU | December 15, 2015

Case Western Reserve University researchers have been awarded two grants totaling $3.16 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to create analytic software for managing, annotating, sharing and analyzing digital pathology imaging data.

Anant Madabhushi, a professor of biomedical engineering, will lead a seven-institute consortium to expand the capabilities of a freely available pathology image viewer, building what they call a “pathology image informatics platform” (PIIP).

To begin, the PIIP will focus on tools for quantifying tissue-based biomarkers and disease patterns on digital images of prostate and breast cancer biopsy.

“A large number of people realize the potential clues within images,” Madabhushi said. “We need to develop the right tools to unlock the data. … This could help drive the precision medicine revolution.”

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Biomedical Engineering’s Anant Madabhushi, Team Awarded Two Patents

Via CWRU | December 10, 2015

Anant Madabhushi, professor of biomedical engineering and director of the Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics (CCIPD), and his team were issued two patents—U.S. patent 9,177,105 and U.S. patent 9,177,014—in pattern recognition of cancer from digital pathology and imaging data.

US Patent 9,177,105, titled “Quantitatively Characterizing Disease Morphology with Co-Occurring Gland Tensors in Localized Subgraphs,” describes a novel methodology for quantitatively describing disease morphology via gland directional entropy in medical images. The algorithm involves the use of second-order statistics to describe local disorder in gland orientations via co-occurring gland tensors. This technology is being used for predicting disease outcomes in prostate cancer histopathology and on high-resolution MRI.

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5 Questions With Professor Of Biomedical Engineering Anant Madabhushi

Via The Daily | August 7, 2015

As a high school student in Bombay (now Mumbai), India, in the 1990s, Anant Madabhushi competed against thousands of students for a spot in the country’s premier medical and engineering schools.

Then, his uncle, an engineer with General Electric in the United States, sent him a book on biomedical engineering—at the time, an emerging discipline.

Madabhushi realized biomedical engineering would allow him to converge his strengths in math, engineering and medicine, and he jumped at the opportunity.

Madabhushi’s decision paid off: Now a professor of biomedical engineering, he has earned a multitude of grants to support his research, which focuses on medical imaging data with the hopes of improving cancer diagnostics and treatments. He also serves as director of the Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics at Case Western Reserve University and is a co-founder of Ibris Inc., a startup company that develops image-based assessments for breast cancer prognosis.

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Anant Madabhushi Named Associate Member Of Quantitative Imaging Network, Associate Editor Of BMC Medical Imaging

Via CWRU | March 13, 2015

Anant Madabhushi, professor of biomedical engineering and director of the Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics at Case Western Reserve University, was elected unanimously to the National Cancer Institute’s Quantitative Imaging Network on account of his ongoing NCI-funded grant R01CA136535-01 titled, “Software to facilitate multimode, multi-scale fused data for Pathology and Radiology.”

The network is designed to promote research and development of quantitative imaging methods for the measurement of tumor response to therapies in clinical trial settings, with the overall goal of facilitating clinical decision-making. Projects include the appropriate development and adaptation and implementation of quantitative imaging methods, imaging protocols, and software solutions and tools and application of these methods in current and planned clinical therapy trials. The projects are focusing on imaging-derived quantitative measurements of responses to drugs and/or radiation therapy, and/or image-guided interventions.

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Anant Madabhushi, Ph.D. To be Inducted into Medical and Biological Engineering Elite

Via AIMBE | March 5, 2015

WASHINGTON, D.C.— The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the pending induction of Anant Madabhushi, Ph.D., Director of the Center for Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics (CCIPD); Professor in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Pathology, Radiology, Urology, General Medical Sciences, and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, to its College of Fellows. Dr. Madabhushi was nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows For outstanding research and translational contributions in the field of medical image analysis and computer aided diagnosis.

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