image_alt_text
2

Kristy Arbogast, Ph.D.

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2015
For outstanding scientific contributions to pediatric biomechanics that led to new safety products, test procedures, clinical care guidelines and laws that have resulted in dramatic reductions in child deaths

Researchers identify head impact rates in four major high school sports

Via EurekAlert | March 17, 2021

As high school athletes return to practice and games for a variety of sports, the threat of concussions remains. A new study from researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) used head impact sensors in four different sports and studied male and female athletes to determine which of these sports put students at the highest risk for head impacts that could lead to concussions. The findings were published online by the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine.

“Adolescents are particularly vulnerable to concussion because they frequently participate in sporting and recreational activities and have slower recovery periods compared to adults,” said Kristy Arbogast, PhD, senior author and co-lead of the Minds Matter Concussion Program at CHOP. “Providing reliable data on head impact exposure and sport-specific mechanisms may help sports organizations identify strategies to reduce impact exposure and lower the risk of acute injury… Continue reading.

CHOP Study Demonstrates How to Collect True Impact Incidents from Head Impact Sensors in Youth Sports

Via WFMZ-TV 69 News | March 31, 2020

An increased awareness of concussion risks in young athletes has prompted researchers to use a variety of head impact sensors to measure frequency and severity of impacts during sports. A new study from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) shows these head sensors can record a large number of false positive impacts during real game play. The CHOP team’s study emphasizes that an extra step to video-confirm the sensor data is essential for research and for use of this data in injury prevention strategies for player safety.

The findings were published online this month by the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

Approximately 1 in 5 high school athletes who plays a contact sport – such as soccer, lacrosse, and American football – suffers a concussion each year. To understand the frequency, magnitude and direction of head impacts that athletes sustain, a wide variety of sensors have been developed to collect head impact biomechanics data, including instrumented helmets, skull caps, headbands, mouthguards and skin patches… Continue reading.

Kristy Arbogast, Ph.D. To be Inducted into Medical and Biological Engineering Elite

Via AIMBE | March 5, 2015

WASHINGTON, D.C.— The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the pending induction of Kristy Arbogast, Ph.D., Associate Research Professor and Co-Scientific Director, Department of Pediatrics/Division of Emergency Medicine and Center for Injury Research and Prevention, University of Pennsylvania and The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, to its College of Fellows. Dr. Arbogast was nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows For outstanding scientific contributions to pediatric biomechanics that led to new safety products, test procedures, clinical care guidelines and laws that have resulted in dramatic reductions in child deaths.