image_alt_text
7

Jennifer A. Lewis, Ph.D.

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2018
For pioneering contributions to the fields of materials science and 3D printing, and their application to device fabrication and biomanufacturing.

Fabrication of Shape-conformable Batteries Based on 3D-printing Technology

Via KAIST | December 20, 2018

Flexible, wireless electronic devices are rapidly emerging and have reached the level of commercialization; nevertheless, most of battery shapes are limited to either spherical and/or rectangular structures, which results in inefficient space use. Professor Il-Doo Kim’s team from the Department of Materials Science at KAIST has successfully developed technology to significantly enhance the variability of battery design through collaboration research with Professor Jennifer A. Lewis and her team from the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University.

Most of the battery shapes today are optimized for coin cell and/or pouch cells. Since the battery as an energy storage device occupies most of the space in microelectronic devices with different designs, new technology to freely change the shape of the battery is required… Continue reading.

...

Engineers design color-changing compression bandage

Via MIT | May 29, 2018

Compression therapy is a standard form of treatment for patients who suffer from venous ulcers and other conditions in which veins struggle to return blood from the lower extremities. Compression stockings and bandages, wrapped tightly around the affected limb, can help to stimulate blood flow. But there is currently no clear way to gauge whether a bandage is applying an optimal pressure for a given condition.

Now engineers at MIT have developed pressure-sensing photonic fibers that they have woven into a typical compression bandage. As the bandage is stretched, the fibers change color. Using a color chart, a caregiver can stretch a bandage until it matches the color for a desired pressure, before, say, wrapping it around a patient’s leg.

The photonic fibers can then serve as a continuous pressure sensor — if their color changes, caregivers or patients can use the color chart to determine whether and to what degree the bandage needs loosening or tightening… Continue reading.

...

Dr. Jennifer Lewis Inducted into Medical and Biological Engineering Elite

Via AIMBE | April 10, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the induction of Jennifer A. Lewis, Ph.D., Hansjorg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Core Faculty Member, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, to its College of Fellows. Dr. Lewis was nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows for pioneering contributions to the fields of materials science and 3D printing, and their application to device fabrication and biomanufacturing.

...