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Joseph C. Wu, MD, Ph.D.

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2018
For outstanding contributions towards using stem cells for disease modeling, drug screening, clinical trial in a dish, and precision medicine.

Study solves mystery of genetic-test results for patient with suspected heart condition

Via Stanford Medicine | June 26, 2018

Although DNA testing is becoming increasingly quick, cheap and easy to perform, the results are sometimes ambiguous: Gene mutations called “variants of uncertain significance” can create uncertainty about a patient’s risk for a disease.

“This is a really big problem,” said Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, professor of cardiovascular medicine and of radiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. “If someone tells me I have a genetic variant that could cause sudden cardiac death, I’m going to be very scared. The result could be a lifetime of unnecessary worry for a patient when, in fact, the variant may be completely benign.”

Now, Wu and a team of researchers have developed a technique that could shed light on the significance of such variants. In a new paper, they discuss how they used advanced genetic-editing tools and stem cell technology to determine whether a 39-year-old patient with one of these mysterious mutations was at increased risk for a heart-rhythm condition called long QT syndrome, which can cause erratic heartbeats, fainting and sudden cardiac death… Continue reading.

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Scientists edit heart muscle gene in stem cells, may be able to predict risk

Via CNN | June 18, 2018

In our human genome, there are many elusive genetic variants related to medical conditions, but the impact of these variants to actually cause a disease has not been conclusively determined — or ruled out.
In other words, the impact certain variants could have on your health remains a guessing game.
But a new study involving the gene-editing tool CRISPR could change that.

The study, published in the journal Circulation on Monday, demonstrates for the first time how pairing CRISPR with induced pluripotent stem cell technology could be used to determine the risk of a genetic variant for cardiovascular disease… Continue reading.

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Dr. Joseph Wu Inducted into Medical and Biological Engineering Elite

Via AIMBE | April 10, 2018

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the induction of Joseph C. Wu, MD, Ph.D., Simon H. Stertzer Endowed Professor of Medicine & Radiology; Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Department of Medicine (Division of Cardiology) & Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, to its College of Fellows. Dr. Wu was nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows for outstanding contributions towards using stem cells for disease modeling, drug screening, clinical trial in a dish, and precision medicine.

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