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Danielle Benoit, Ph.D.

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2019
For outstanding contributions to the design of 'smart' materials to treat diseases, control cell behavior, and answer fundamental biological questions.

Rochester researchers seek ‘direct hit’ on leukemic stem cells

Via University of Rochester | February 25, 2022

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a particularly aggressive disease that develops when cells in the bone marrow turn into cancerous blood cells. Even when chemotherapy or other treatments kill leukemic cells circulating in the blood, the cancerous stem cells can linger in the bone marrow, enabling the disease to re-emerge.

With support of internal seed funding, an interdisciplinary team of chemists, biomedical engineers, and basic scientists at the University of Rochester report progress in targeting and destroying these leukemic stem cells with a modified form of micheliolide, a natural product found in plants of the magnolia family… Continue reading.

Dr. Danielle Benoit Inducted into Medical and Biological Engineering Elite

Via AIMBE | March 28, 2019

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the induction of Danielle Benoit, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Orthopaedics, University of Rochester, to its College of Fellows.

Election to the AIMBE College of Fellows is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to a medical and biological engineer. The College of Fellows is comprised of the top two percent of medical and biological engineers. College membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to “engineering and medicine research, practice, or education” and to “the pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of medical and biological engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to bioengineering education.”

Dr. Benoit was nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows for “outstanding contributions to the design of ‘smart’ materials to treat diseases, control cell behavior, and answer fundamental biological questions.”