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Sunitha Nagrath, Ph.D.

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2021
For pioneering work on microfluidic technologies for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) isolation and genotyping leading novel cancer treatments.

Dr. Sunitha Nagrath to be inducted into medical and biological engineering elite

Via AIMBE | February 15, 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has announced the election of Sunitha Nagrath, Ph.D., to its College of Fellows. Dr. Nagrath was nominated, reviewed, and elected by peers and members of the College of Fellows for pioneering work on microfluidic technologies for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) isolation and genotyping leading novel cancer treatments.

The College of Fellows is comprised of the top two percent of medical and biological engineers in the country. The most accomplished and distinguished engineering and medical school chairs, research directors, professors, innovators, and successful entrepreneurs comprise the College of Fellows. AIMBE Fellows are regularly recognized for their contributions in teaching, research, and innovation. AIMBE Fellows have been awarded the Nobel Prize, the Presidential Medal of Science and the Presidential Medal of Technology and Innovation and many also are members of the National Academy of Engineering, National Academy of Medicine, and the National Academy of Sciences… Continue reading.

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Scientists “Farm” Natural Killer Cells Using a Microfluidic Chip in Novel Cancer Fighting Approach

Via Scitech Daily | January 28, 2021

Engineers and oncologists teamed to develop a microfluidic chip capable of capturing the body’s natural killer immune cells to harvest their cancer-killing exosomes.

Building on the promise of emerging therapies to deploy the body’s “natural killer” immune cells to fight cancer, researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center and U-M College of Engineering have gone one step further.

They’ve developed what is believed to be the first systematic way to catch natural killer cells and get them to release cancer-killing packets called exosomes. These nano-scale exosomes are thousands of times smaller than natural killer cells — or NK cells for short — and thus better able to penetrate cancer cells’ defenses… Continue reading.

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