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Arnold Caplan, Ph.D.

AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2010
For significantly advancing our understanding of the development, maturation and aging of mesenchymal tissues and pioneered research on mesenchymal stem cells.

New molecular probes to allow non-destructive analysis of bioengineered cartilage

Via EurekAlert | January 16, 2018

New Rochelle, NY, January 16, 2018–A new study describes novel probes that enable non-invasive, non-destructive, direct monitoring of the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in real-time during the formation of engineered cartilage to replace damaged or diseased tissue. These molecular probes make it possible to assess the quality of the cartilaginous tissue and its suitability for implantation as it is forming, and to make modifications to enhance the multi-step process of MSC differentiation into chondrocytes “on the go,” as described in a study published in Tissue Engineering, Part A, peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Tissue Engineering (http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/ten.tea.2017.0125) website until February 16, 2018.

Coauthors Diego Correa, MD, PhD, Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH) and University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine (FL), and Rodrigo Somoza, PhD and Arnold Caplan, PhD, Case Western Reserve University report the significant advantages of these new molecular probes for improving the design and fabrication of engineered cartilage in the article entitled “Nondestructive/Noninvasive Imaging Evaluation of Cellular Differentiation Progression During In Vitro Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Chondrogenesis… Continue reading.

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