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Fellowbook News

AIMBE Fellowbook collects news stories highlighting the members of the AIMBE College of Fellows. Read the latest stories, jump to the College Directory, or search below to find the newest research, awards, announcements and more for the leaders of the medical and biological engineering community.

 

 

Wyss Institute Models a Human Disease in an Organ-on-a-Chip

Donald Ingber | Via Wyss Institute | November 7, 2012

Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University have mimicked pulmonary edema in a microchip lined by living human cells, as reported today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. They used this “lung-on-a-chip” to study drug toxicity and identify potential new therapies to prevent this life-threatening condition. The study offers further […]

Georgia Tech Gets $1.2M Diabetes Training Grant

Athanassios Sambanis | Via American City Business Journals | November 7, 2012

Georgia Tech receieved a $1.2 million federal grant to train post-doctoral fellows to develop bioengineering skills to research into type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The grant, awarded by the National Institutes of Health, is a cross-disciplinary training program in cell- and tissue-based therapies and novel insulin delivery technologies. Ten faculty members from Georgia Tech […]

Duke Invention Makes WHO Top 10 List of Most Innovative Health Technologies

Robert Malkin | Via Duke Global Health Institute | November 6, 2012

The World Health Organization has selected the Pratt Pouch as one of the top ten innovative health technologies of the year for use in low-resource settings around the world. Developed by Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering and DGHI faculty member Robert Malkin, the Pratt Pouch helps stop the spread of disease from HIV-infected mothers to […]

Laser-Light Testing of Breast Tumor Fiber Patterns Helps Show Whose Cancer is Spreading

Zaver Bhujwalla | Via Johns Hopkins Medicine | November 5, 2012

Using advanced microscopes equipped with tissue-penetrating laser light, cancer imaging experts at Johns Hopkins have developed a promising new way to accurately analyze the distinctive patterns of ultra-thin collagen fibers in breast tumor tissue samples and to help tell if the cancer has spread. The Johns Hopkins researchers say their crisscrossing optical images, made by […]

Seal and Ph.D. Student Reid Win AVS Awards

Sudipta Seal | Via UCF Today | November 4, 2012

Dr. Sudipta Seal and David Reid will be honored by AVS: Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing. The AVS Awards Ceremony will be held on Wednesday, October 31, 2012 in Tampa, FL. Seal will receive the 2012 AVS Fellow award “for pioneering developments in design and synthesis of nanostructures for protective coatings, sensors, […]

Giorgio Named Distinguished Alumnus by Rice University Bioengineering Department

Todd D. Giorgio | Via Vanderbilt School of Engineering | November 2, 2012

Todd D. Giorgio has been named a 2012 Distinguished Bioengineering Alumnus by the department of bioengineering at Rice University in Houston, Texas. Giorgio earned a doctorate in chemical engineering from Rice in 1986. The department’s alumni awards honor excellence in research, teaching, service or significant contributions to academia, society or the bioengineering industry. Giorgio was […]

Tomorrow’s Technology: Regenerative Medicine

Milos Popovic | Via University of Toronto | October 30, 2012

At IBBME’s 50th Anniversary Symposium, ‘Defining Tomorrow: Advancing the Integration of Engineering and Medicine,’ speakers discussed the many regenerative medicine strategies currently being researched by engineers and scientists – from spinal cord injuries, to Alzheimer’s disease, to stroke patients. Professor Milos Popovic, who holds the Toronto Rehab Chair in Spinal Cord Injury Research at the […]

Finding Triggers of Birth Defects in an Embryo Heart: Technology Creates 3-D Map Of Stresses Linked To Malformed Structures

Andrew Rollins | Via Case Western Reserve University | October 30, 2012

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have found a way to create three-dimensional maps of the stress that circulating blood places on the developing heart in an animal model – a key to understanding triggers of heart defects. The team has begun testing the technology to uncover how alcohol, drugs and other factors set off […]

GH PLUS Supports Biomedical Equipment Training Program in Honduras

Robert Malkin | Via Duke Global Health Institute | October 29, 2012

Through Duke Global Health Plus, Duke is helping build capacity for skilled health care workers and hospitals outfitted with medical equipment to better treat patients in low- and middle-income countries. The program recycles surplus medical equipment and supplies from the Duke University Health System for use by Duke faculty or Duke-affiliated physicians on global projects […]

Inside the Beating Heart

Paul Iaizzo | Via University of Minnesota | October 29, 2012

Paul Iaizzo, Ph.D., Director of the University of Minnesota’s Visible Heart Laboratory, has given the medical world a unique, never-before-seen view inside the beating heart. Part of the Medical School’s Experimental Surgical Services, the lab has reanimated hundreds of hearts, including about 50 human hearts, using a clear, artificial blood that lets tiny camera-equipped catheters […]

Black Bear: Medical Marvel

Paul Iaizzo | Via University of Minnesota | October 29, 2012

In the mid-1990s, Paul Iaizzo, Ph.D., was studying muscle loss in intensive care unit patients when he received an intriguing phone call. “How would you like to study a population of individuals who do not get weak even though they’re immobilized for four to six months?” the caller asked. Iaizzo responded, “Well, that would be […]

Taking the Sting Out of Medical Tape

Jeffrey Karp | Via Massachusetts Institute of Technology | October 29, 2012

Ripping off a Band-Aid may sting for a few seconds, but the pain is usually quickly forgotten. However, for newborns’ sensitive skin, tearing off any kind of adhesive can pose a serious risk. Newborns lack an epidermis — the tough outermost layer of skin — so medical tape used to secure respirators or monitoring devices […]

Spiderwebs May Inspire Better Medical Tape

Jeffrey Karp | Via CNN | October 29, 2012

Taking medical tape off an adult isn’t too painful because breakage occurs in the glue (you can sometimes see the leftover residue). But removing the same adhesive from a newborn can break fragile skin, causing significant damage, says Jeffrey Karp, researcher at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Traditional medical tape has two layers: the […]

Spiderwebs May Inspire Better Medical Tape

Robert Langer | Via CNN | October 29, 2012

Taking medical tape off an adult isn’t too painful because breakage occurs in the glue (you can sometimes see the leftover residue). But removing the same adhesive from a newborn can break fragile skin, causing significant damage, says Jeffrey Karp, researcher at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Traditional medical tape has two layers: the […]

Taking the Sting Out of Medical Tape

Robert Langer | Via Massachusetts Institute of Technology | October 29, 2012

Ripping off a Band-Aid may sting for a few seconds, but the pain is usually quickly forgotten. However, for newborns’ sensitive skin, tearing off any kind of adhesive can pose a serious risk. Newborns lack an epidermis — the tough outermost layer of skin — so medical tape used to secure respirators or monitoring devices […]

UA a Big Winner at AZBio Awards

Jennifer Barton | Via UA News | October 25, 2012

Arizona BioIndustry Association award recipients include Rick Myers, chairman of the Arizona Board of Regents; Jennifer Barton, UA associate vice president for research and professor of biomedical engineering; Dr. David S. Alberts of the UA Cancer Center; and Dr. Raymond L. Woosley of the Centers for Education and Research on Therapeutics. Several University of Arizona […]

Bionic ‘Visionaries’ Win Top Honour

Nigel Lovell | Via UNSW Newsroom | October 22, 2012

For their pioneering work on developing a bionic eye, two UNSW engineers have been honoured with a prestigious research achievement award. Scientia Professor Nigel Lovell and Associate Professor Gregg Suaning have received the Bartimaeus Award for internationally recognised contributions to the field of vision restoration by way of neural prosthesis. “This award is among the […]

White and Wilcox Awarded two Grants to Investigate Difficult-to-Treat Epilepsies

John White | Via University of Utah | October 19, 2012

Brain Institute Investigator John White, Ph.D., and Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology Karen Wilcox, Ph.D., were awarded $1.7 Million from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and $300,000 from the Ben B. and Iris M. Margolis Foundation to study the roles of astrocytes in epilepsy. There are over three million Americans with epilepsy, […]

Inside Health Policy – Regulatory Science Centers Push Forward Despite Funding Uncertainty

William Bentley | Via Friends of Cancer Research | October 18, 2012

Leaders of two academic centers tapped last year to pilot FDA’s Centers of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation program said they are concerned about possible loss of funding due to sequestration or a constrained fiscal environment but are moving ahead while also remaining hopeful that some of the work would continue if federal funding […]

New Study Shows Reprogrammed Amniotic Fluid Cells Could Treat Vascular Diseases

Sina Rabbany | Via Weill Cornell Medical College | October 18, 2012

A research team at Weill Cornell Medical College has discovered a way to utilize diagnostic prenatal amniocentesis cells, reprogramming them into abundant and stable endothelial cells capable of regenerating damaged blood vessels and repairing injured organs. Blood vessel composed of new endothelial cells, created from reprogrammed amniotic fluid-derived cells Their study, published online today in […]